sonder.

n. the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own—populated with their own ambitions, friends, routines, worries and inherited craziness—an epic story that continues invisibly around you like an anthill sprawling deep underground, with elaborate passageways to thousands of other lives that you’ll never know existed, in which you might appear only once, as an extra sipping coffee in the background, as a blur of traffic passing on the highway, as a lighted window at dusk. - The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows
Anonymous asked:
Interesting. I guess the only question I have left is how much say do I get in the travel playlists?

It would be lame to spend so much time with someone and not share musical tastes with each other. So as much say as you want.

The only qualification is that we listen to Johnny Cash’s “I’ve Been Everywhere” like a billion times.

Savannah, Georgia
On our way back from Nag’s Head, we decided to stop in Savannah, Georgia, as my mom had always wanted to visit. I had no preconceptions of the place, but the experience turned out to be pleasurable enough. We went in on Labor Day weekend, so that was a mess, but exploring the historic district and learning its history made it worth it. More than anywhere else I’ve been to, I could feel the history here, as in I had an easy time of replicating it in my head. Passing the Thunderbird Inn, with its shameless 1960s-era Googie and neon signage, I could envision the cruisers in the parking lot. On the waterfront, I could envision a time when the steam boats were used for things other than tourism. At the railroad station, I could envision clunking passenger cars being backed into the platform. The city’s history felt alive, and it felt a lot more sincere than the obtuse tourism that had replaced it.
There was way too much to experience in one day, so I would love to come back. Spend a few days and get to know the culture beneath the tourism. 
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Savannah, Georgia
On our way back from Nag’s Head, we decided to stop in Savannah, Georgia, as my mom had always wanted to visit. I had no preconceptions of the place, but the experience turned out to be pleasurable enough. We went in on Labor Day weekend, so that was a mess, but exploring the historic district and learning its history made it worth it. More than anywhere else I’ve been to, I could feel the history here, as in I had an easy time of replicating it in my head. Passing the Thunderbird Inn, with its shameless 1960s-era Googie and neon signage, I could envision the cruisers in the parking lot. On the waterfront, I could envision a time when the steam boats were used for things other than tourism. At the railroad station, I could envision clunking passenger cars being backed into the platform. The city’s history felt alive, and it felt a lot more sincere than the obtuse tourism that had replaced it.
There was way too much to experience in one day, so I would love to come back. Spend a few days and get to know the culture beneath the tourism. 
Zoom
Info
Savannah, Georgia
On our way back from Nag’s Head, we decided to stop in Savannah, Georgia, as my mom had always wanted to visit. I had no preconceptions of the place, but the experience turned out to be pleasurable enough. We went in on Labor Day weekend, so that was a mess, but exploring the historic district and learning its history made it worth it. More than anywhere else I’ve been to, I could feel the history here, as in I had an easy time of replicating it in my head. Passing the Thunderbird Inn, with its shameless 1960s-era Googie and neon signage, I could envision the cruisers in the parking lot. On the waterfront, I could envision a time when the steam boats were used for things other than tourism. At the railroad station, I could envision clunking passenger cars being backed into the platform. The city’s history felt alive, and it felt a lot more sincere than the obtuse tourism that had replaced it.
There was way too much to experience in one day, so I would love to come back. Spend a few days and get to know the culture beneath the tourism. 
Zoom
Info
Savannah, Georgia
On our way back from Nag’s Head, we decided to stop in Savannah, Georgia, as my mom had always wanted to visit. I had no preconceptions of the place, but the experience turned out to be pleasurable enough. We went in on Labor Day weekend, so that was a mess, but exploring the historic district and learning its history made it worth it. More than anywhere else I’ve been to, I could feel the history here, as in I had an easy time of replicating it in my head. Passing the Thunderbird Inn, with its shameless 1960s-era Googie and neon signage, I could envision the cruisers in the parking lot. On the waterfront, I could envision a time when the steam boats were used for things other than tourism. At the railroad station, I could envision clunking passenger cars being backed into the platform. The city’s history felt alive, and it felt a lot more sincere than the obtuse tourism that had replaced it.
There was way too much to experience in one day, so I would love to come back. Spend a few days and get to know the culture beneath the tourism. 
Zoom
Info

Savannah, Georgia

On our way back from Nag’s Head, we decided to stop in Savannah, Georgia, as my mom had always wanted to visit. I had no preconceptions of the place, but the experience turned out to be pleasurable enough. We went in on Labor Day weekend, so that was a mess, but exploring the historic district and learning its history made it worth it. More than anywhere else I’ve been to, I could feel the history here, as in I had an easy time of replicating it in my head. Passing the Thunderbird Inn, with its shameless 1960s-era Googie and neon signage, I could envision the cruisers in the parking lot. On the waterfront, I could envision a time when the steam boats were used for things other than tourism. At the railroad station, I could envision clunking passenger cars being backed into the platform. The city’s history felt alive, and it felt a lot more sincere than the obtuse tourism that had replaced it.

There was way too much to experience in one day, so I would love to come back. Spend a few days and get to know the culture beneath the tourism. 

(Source: sonderlife.com)

MV Tønsberg
This massive cargo ship rolled through Savannah while I was on the waterfront. I’m talking, all of a sudden your view across the harbor was obstructed completely. I was in awe, partly from its size and partly from seeing such a powerful example of human engineering in the flesh.
From Wikipedia:
"MV Tønsberg is a roll-on/roll-off ship owned by Wilh. Wilhelmsen. As of 2012 it is the largest RORO ship in the world.
Dimensions: MV Tønsberg is 265m length overall and 32.26m wide, and has 11m draught and 46m of airdraught. Gross tonnage is 76,500 gt. Capacity is 5% - 7% higher than Mark IV roro ships.
Decks: Six fixed decks and three hoistable ones (4B, 6 and 8, lifted by electric winches). The main deck can take loads 7.1m high - more than other vessels - allowing very large loads. The total deck space is 50,335 m² and cargo volume is 138,000 m³. Internal ramps are 8 metres wide; The weather deck (which can be used for outsize or unusual loads, such as wind turbine blades) also has a 4m wide ramp from below, to reduce the need for cranes.
Stern ramp: The stern ramp is 12m wide and can take loads of 505 tonnes.
Design: Hull form has been improved, so compared to previous ships it will use 15 - 20% less fuel per unit of cargo. Stability has been improved, to reduce the need for ballast water. There is a double bottom and Deck 5 is also watertight.
Propulsion: 7-cylinder MAN B&W engine, which has been derated from 22,890 kW to 20,100 kW MCR at 108rpm; (although normal output in service is 18,090 kW), driving a 7.3m diameter 6-bladed propeller; plus two 2,500 kW Kawasaki thrusters (one each at the bow and the stern). Service speed is 20.25 knots.”

MV Tønsberg

This massive cargo ship rolled through Savannah while I was on the waterfront. I’m talking, all of a sudden your view across the harbor was obstructed completely. I was in awe, partly from its size and partly from seeing such a powerful example of human engineering in the flesh.

From Wikipedia:

"MV Tønsberg is a roll-on/roll-off ship owned by Wilh. Wilhelmsen. As of 2012 it is the largest RORO ship in the world.

Dimensions: MV Tønsberg is 265m length overall and 32.26m wide, and has 11m draught and 46m of airdraught. Gross tonnage is 76,500 gt. Capacity is 5% - 7% higher than Mark IV roro ships.

Decks: Six fixed decks and three hoistable ones (4B, 6 and 8, lifted by electric winches). The main deck can take loads 7.1m high - more than other vessels - allowing very large loads. The total deck space is 50,335 m² and cargo volume is 138,000 m³. Internal ramps are 8 metres wide; The weather deck (which can be used for outsize or unusual loads, such as wind turbine blades) also has a 4m wide ramp from below, to reduce the need for cranes.

Stern ramp: The stern ramp is 12m wide and can take loads of 505 tonnes.

Design: Hull form has been improved, so compared to previous ships it will use 15 - 20% less fuel per unit of cargo. Stability has been improved, to reduce the need for ballast water. There is a double bottom and Deck 5 is also watertight.

Propulsion: 7-cylinder MAN B&W engine, which has been derated from 22,890 kW to 20,100 kW MCR at 108rpm; (although normal output in service is 18,090 kW), driving a 7.3m diameter 6-bladed propeller; plus two 2,500 kW Kawasaki thrusters (one each at the bow and the stern). Service speed is 20.25 knots.”

(Source: sonderlife.com)

Seeking: Female photographer and travel addict

We can go to all the photogenic places in the world and stay up all night taking photos of cities at night and taking awesome selfies and being lovey dovey.

Pros of being with me:

  • I love pizza and will buy you a lot
  • Like, seriously, a lot
  • You’ll look more attractive while standing next to me
  • I’ll make corny and romantic compliments
  • I am (Chris Traeger voice) LITERALLY the most easygoing person in the world
  • pizza

Cons of being with me:

  • None
  • I burn easily
  • I love off-color humor and will make a lot of it
  • I’m super sarcastic
  • actually both of those are pros
  • None

(Source: sonderlife.com)

The dark side of sonder.

We stopped in Georgia tonight and ate at a restaurant near our hotel, and I noticed something that I just can’t shake. Sitting near us was a couple - an old white man and a young Asian woman and her young son. It very clearly looked like a mail order bride type of situation, which in general has its nuances, but it was the man’s attitude that sank my spirit.

He was clearly a miserable dude - he kept ordering the child not to keep eating spaghetti, seemingly angry at the kid’s existence. When the woman left the restaurant briefly and took the kid with her, he had an obvious look of “what did I get myself into?” It was such a miserable and depressing thing to watch - not just because of the sadness of the whole situation, but also because I realized that child will grow up in a household devoid of love, or worse, grow up in an environment where his paternal figure dislikes him. I mean, maybe this man was just frustrated tonight and out of his element. I certainly hope so. But I have a sinking feeling the truth is a little darker than that.

(Source: sonderlife.com)

Anonymous asked:
what do you want in life?

Again with the big questions!

I’m not too picky. I want to be able to make rent/mortgage and support a hobby.

The big items though are:

1) 1959 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz in argyle blue paint scheme. Eldorados have a special trim on them that emphasizes the flamboyance of the design more, which is why I want it over a Fleetwood or Series 62. Biarritz denotes the soft top convertible sub category of the Eldorado line. Honestly though, these are rare and expensive cars, especially in argyle blue, and especially in good condition. Probably looking at $100k+. I’ve seen frame off restorations of the Biarritz go for a quarter of a million before (in black/red two tone). I’d probably settle for one of the more common Series 62 or Fleetwood models. I also wouldn’t mind any number of 1950s boats, notably the Buick models.

2) A Siberian Huskie. I think raising and training a dog is a huge challenge, but a rewarding one, and I think Huskies are beautiful. They’re also stubborn, energetic and shed a lot so I’m in for a ride.

Anonymous asked:
what did you struggle with when you were starting photography?

Ha, that would be the ego effect.

I was lucky that exposure fundamentals and camera mechanics came really easy to me (Thanks to Ben Long, an excellent teacher on Lynda tutorials).

But when I first figured it all out and started to use it creatively, I thought the photos I was taking were THE BEST DAMN THING TO HAPPEN EVER. I think this is part of the honeymoon effect of learning photography - you trick yourself into thinking you’re the best when you can consistently achieve good exposure and focus etc.

But in hindsight, many of the photos I thought were great were just mediocre or below average at best. Does that mean I’ll view my current photos the same way a year from now? I don’t know. I think I took some technically competent and interesting photos while in California (stuff that I would sell), but I’ve also been humbled by seeing the work of my peers that are SO much better than what I’m doing, and I’ve learned more about what goes into a good photo - and I have a LOT more to learn.

Anonymous asked:
favorite album of 2014 and favorite of all time

Woah! Asking the tough ones.

Favorite of 2014 is definitely We Are the In Crowd’s Weird Kids. It’s a stylistic jump forward, but still WATIC at its core. Best Intentions was very much just an extension of Guaranteed to Disagree, and I personally think that sound is a pretty crunchy representation of pop-punk. Weird Kids has that sound too, but more variation.

Favorite of all time is incredibly tough to answer. Ten years ago it would have been American Idiot. Six months ago, probably Sempiternal. I think to answer this properly, I need to think about which albums shaped me fundamentally and have some sort of lasting inspiration to me.

I’m going to go with Owl City’s Ocean Eyes. And I feel like I need to justify that choice, as a lot of people didn’t take that album seriously, and it needs some context. Adam Young is a professed introvert and insomniac, and I remember reading interviews with him about how the music he creates is born out of late-night loneliness, etc. His songwriting style isn’t very direct - messages are covered by layer and layer of dreamy metaphors (or bad puns) and colorful descriptions that evoke surreal images in your head. Underneath all of that, surrounded by golden, flowing synth, is the mental machinations of someone plagued by anxiety and heartbreak and the feeling that being social is almost a chore. And I relate to that so, so well. Yet, there are points of optimism and love on the album that are warm and fuzzy. All this put together strikes a major chord with me, and it makes me feel a little less lost.

Anonymous asked:
show you're looking forward to?

I’m not sure how many shows I’ll be able to go to in the near future, so I’ll have to be pretty selective.

I’m really stoked that Tonight Alive is touring with Mayday Parade (and that PVRIS is on the bill as well), so I want to see/shoot that show.

New Found Glory and We Are the in Crowd seems like a good one too. I’m not too familiar with NFG, but I hear they’re fun live.

Finally, Anberlin’s farewell tour ends in Orlando. Their last show ever. I want to shoot that.

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